Jenny Telwar has lived in Nashville for 25 years. With today’s influx of new people moving to Music City, that practically makes her a native. Having been here since 1994, she remembers downtown Nashville without Nissan Stadium or Bridgestone Arena.

As a managing broker for Zeitlin Sotheby’s International Realty’s Green Hills office, Jenny believes being able to put Nashville’s growth into context for her clients helps make her better at what she does.

Stephanie Brooks, Charlie Neese and Jenny Telwar are long-time Nashvillians and realtors at Zeitlin Sotheby’s International Realty who have their finger on the pulse of Music City.

“Relocation clients all want to know the depth of Nashville,” Jenny says. “The surface is easy to go over. The area is rebuilding. Everyone can see that, but people want some history. They want to know what has evolved over the last 20-25 years. I love reminiscing about things that are part of the natural landscape.”

She predicts Nashville’s growth in the downtown corridor is going to continue with new residential high-rise developments already in the works.

“Downtown is going to get more retail, more living options, more workspaces and cultural environments that are slated to start development in the next two to five years,” she says. “The continued opportunity for progress in downtown is only getting started.”

Jenny Telwar is a managing broker for Zeitlin Sotheby’s International Realty’s Green Hills office.

Jenny is able to put things into perspective for her relocation clients. “People want some history,” she says. “They want to know what has evolved over the last 20-25 years.”

Stephanie Brooks, managing broker in Zeitlin Sotheby’s International Realty’s Belle Meade office brings 35 years of Nashville living to her role with the company. She and her husband have lived in the same circa-1930s house on the west side of town for the bulk of their lives here and have become engrained in that community.

She says her clients fall in love with Nashville’s west side because of the established neighborhoods and convenience to downtown. “You can get almost anywhere quickly because there are always more than one way to get where you are going. You learn the back roads,” she explains.

In addition to the massive appeal of the Sylvan Park neighborhood, which Stephanie says has captured the interest of all age groups with its sidewalks, connectivity and restaurants such as Answer and Edley’s Bar-B-Que, she says the Nations and the Charlotte Pike area also have a lot to offer.

“There are lots of new dining options with Pancho & Lefty’s Cantina, 51st Kitchen, the Taproom for East Nashville Beer Works, Hathorne and the Café at Thistle Farms,” Stephanie says. “And some restaurants that are coming soon to these areas include Barista Parlor and the Bearded Iris. Those, combined with some older favorites such as Bobbie’s Dairy Dip and Wendell Smith’s diner, make for some great walkable options.”

Stephanie Brooks, managing broker in Zeitlin Sotheby’s International Realty’s Belle Meade office, is a 35-year Nashvillian.

Stephanie brings a keen knowledge of Nashville past and present to her clients. And she’s intimately familiar with the Belle Meade community in particular.

Charlie Neese is the managing broker for the Williamson County Zeitlin Sotheby’s International Realty office and was born and raised in Williamson County. Growing up between Fairview and Primm Springs in a more remote area of the county, Charlie can tell you pretty much anything you want or need to know about this part of town.

“I know the history of this area because I lived it,” he says. “I have seen all the changes, and I intimately know the area because I have driven these roads … I know the people. I don’t know of a better place to raise a family than Williamson County.”

Charlie said he loves bringing new people to the area and showing them around to help them understand it. “We know we have the best here, but to someone from out of town, they don’t know it until you see it. I always say ‘you have to trust me. It’s going to be special,’ and then you show it to them, and they realize I was right.”

He recently met a couple from New York who were considering relocating to Franklin for a job. Instead of spending the day showing them houses, he drove them through Brentwood, they had dinner in downtown Franklin and walked around Leiper’s Fork. Charlie explained the history of the area to them and said they immediately fell in love.

“They said if they were going to move from the only place they had ever known, this was exactly where they wanted to be,” he shares. “Being able to help people and share this area with them so they can understand it … that is what I love about my job.”

In addition to the history of Williamson County, Charlie is well-versed on what’s to come. He sees the I-840 corridor as a growth area and even sees prices rising in his home spot of Primm Springs, along with the other hot spots of Berry Farms, College Grove and Ladd Park.

But what Charlie is able to see, particularly when he combines his knowledge of history and his understanding of what’s to come in the area he represents, is balance.

“So far, Williamson County and especially Franklin have done a pretty good job of being able to maintain a small-town feel,” he says. “Leiper’s Fork is completely different from when I grew up, yet when you walk through it, you know it’s something special. They didn’t make it something it’s not. And that’s going to be more important as this area grows.”

Charlie Neese grew up in Williamson County between Fairview and Primm Springs. He’s a life-long Tennessean.

Charlie is proud of the tempered growth of Williamson County so far. “Williamson County and especially Franklin have done a pretty good job of being able to maintain a small-town feel,” he says.

Jenny and Stephanie agree. Both Belle Meade and Green Hills have exciting growth ahead but are also areas that are working toward striking a balance.

“It’s an exciting time to move to Nashville,” Jenny adds. “Housing is still affordable, and there are a lot of options on the market. Everyone is so nice and that makes me proud to be a Nashvillian. Even with all the growth we’ve had, Nashville still feels like a small town. We are at a great happy medium right now.”

If you’re interested in buying a home in Belle Meade, Green Hills or Williamson County, these three people know the areas best. To find out more about what home options are available in these areas of town — or even what the best place is to spend a Saturday in those areas — these are the folks who know. Get in touch with them at zeitlin.com.

This article is sponsored by Zeitlin Sotheby’s International Realty. All photography by Leila Grossman of Grannis Photography.