Leeds’ quaint downtown scene and gorgeous countryside vistas can be seen and heard. The babbling waters of the Little Cahaba River, the rolling hills and pastures with majestic horses grazing and the ding-ding of the railroad intersection bells as a train crossing brings traffic to a standstill all offer a refreshing change of pace in our culture of constant connectivity and instant online gratification.

To explore this timeless haven is to be transported to a bygone era, where downtown is largely comprised of one “Main Street,” in this case Parkway Drive, a charming, tree-lined street where colorful flower baskets hang from the street lamps and gently sway in the breeze alongside American flags proudly posted along the sidewalk. It’s a tight-knit community, where each Halloween, all the shops along Parkway Drive open their doors to all of Leeds’ giddy kiddos in disguise.

Parkway Drive is Leeds' charming "Main Street," where the sidewalks are lined with trees, lampposts adorned with hanging baskets of flowers and American flags.

Parkway Drive is Leeds’ charming “Main Street,” where the sidewalks are lined with trees and lampposts are adorned with hanging baskets of flowers and American flags.

Settlers were first drawn to this enclave along the banks of the Little Cahaba River in 1818, because of its fertile land and abundance in coal and mineral ore. The town, incorporated as “Leeds” in 1887, has flourished alongside two large railroads ever since. Pictured here, the tracks behind the historic Southern Railway Depot offer an open space for viewing the surrounding lush greenery that has drawn people to Leeds for nearly a century.

Settlers were first drawn to this enclave along the banks of the Little Cahaba River in 1818, because of its fertile land and abundance of coal and mineral ore. The town, incorporated as “Leeds” in 1887, has flourished alongside two large railroads ever since. Pictured here, the tracks behind the historic Southern Railway Depot offer an open space for viewing the surrounding lush greenery that has drawn people to Leeds for nearly a century.

Leeds possesses a quiet, small-town charm where time seems to slow down.

Leeds possesses a quiet, small-town charm where time seems to slow down.

“I like knowing the clerk at City Hall, as well as the owner of the diner next door, the real people making a day-to-day living here. The Monkey’s Uncle and the Green Up Garden Shop by the post office is so ‘Mayberry’ in a way,” says highly accomplished artisinal potter and Leeds native, Tena Payne of Earthborn Pottery. “It’s really nice being part of a community where so many individuals have embraced entrepreneurship. Leeds has a lot of mom-and-pop businesses that contribute to our identity. Hopefully, we’ll continue to grow in that way.”

This is your quintessential small Southern town—a place where biscuits and barbecue are menu staples and Homecoming, fall festivals and the Christmas parade are communitywide affairs. It’s where a hometown potter with a solid work ethic can make world-renowned earthenware and a motorcycle collector with a vision can create an internationally acclaimed museum and race track. Here in Leeds, elderly Southern gentlemen gather on the small porch of a local garden shop for coffee and small talk each morning and Southern charm is rivaled only by a solid work ethic and strong sense of community.

The Imogene Wright Falletta Visitor Center is a historic structure, which also houses Leeds' Mayor's office.

The Imogene Wright Falletta Visitor Center is a historic structure, which also houses Leeds’ mayor’s office.

Also along Parkway Drive, reside local literature and arts hubs, such as the Leeds Jane Culbreth Library and the Leeds Theatre & Arts Center, a project of the Leeds Arts Council, Inc.

Also along Parkway Drive reside local literature and arts hubs, such as the Leeds Jane Culbreth Library and the Leeds Theatre & Arts Center, a project of the Leeds Arts Council, Inc.

A picturesque gazebo and green space along Parkway Drive, the perfect resting spot to stop and smell the roses.

A picturesque gazebo and green space along Parkway Drive, the perfect place to stop and smell the roses.

The Depot

Following completion of the Georgia-Pacific Railroad line between Birmingham and Atlanta, the Southern Railway Depot was built in 1884. It was restored and placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984. In 1999, the baggage room was converted to a public meeting space, and two museum rooms in the depot feature historical records and artifacts from the railroad’s rich history. The Historic Leeds Depot now serves as a meeting place for the historical preservation and educational outreach efforts of the Railway & Locomotive Historical Society’s Mid-South Chapter, a gathering of railroad history buffs and locomotive fans that are proud custodians of Leeds’ railroad history.

Built in 1884 and restored 100 years later, the Southern Railway Depot in Leeds now serves as a museum and meeting place and is in the National Register of Historic Places.

Built in 1884 and restored 100 years later, the Southern Railway Depot in Leeds now serves as a museum and meeting place and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Railway & Locomotive Historical Society’s Mid-South Chapter has kept artifacts of the railway depot and one room in the depot is a recreated station agent's office, complete with vintage equipment.

The Railway & Locomotive Historical Society’s Mid-South Chapter has kept artifacts of the railway depot, and one room in The Depot is recreated as a station agent’s office, complete with vintage equipment.

An integral piece of American folklore, the tale of John Henry, is said to have taken place in Leeds. The tale has been recounted in a famous folk song, "The Ballad of John Henry," which has been performed by the likes of Johnny Cash, Gillian Welch, Bruce Springsteen, Van Morrison, Doc Watson, Woody Guthrie, Lead Belly and Jerry Lee Lewis, among others. Legend has it that John Henry, the "steel-drivin' man” raced and won an infamous duel of strength against a steam engine during the laying of a railroad that penetrated the Oak Mountain Tunnel in Leeds.

This sign stands beside The Depot and details an integral piece of American folklore, the tale of John Henry, which is said to have taken place in Leeds. The tale has been recounted in a famous folk song, “The Ballad of John Henry,” which has been performed by the likes of Johnny Cash, Gillian Welch, Bruce Springsteen, Van Morrison, Doc Watson, Woody Guthrie, Lead Belly and Jerry Lee Lewis, among others. Legend has it that John Henry, the “steel-drivin’ man” raced and won an infamous duel of strength against a steam engine during the laying of a railroad that penetrated the Oak Mountain Tunnel in Leeds.

Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum

One might initially write off this motorsports museum as a guy thing, but you’d be sorely mistaken. Local businessman George Barber, of Barber Dairy, had been building a collection of world-class motorcycles in the original Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum in Southside in downtown Birmingham when New York’s Guggenheim Museum called in 1997. They invited George to feature 21 of his best motorcycles at the museum’s “The Art of the Motorcycle” exhibit, which subsequently traveled to Chicago and even Spain. This fusion of motorcycles recognized as art across the globe inspired George to create a museum right here in Birmingham.

In September 2003, the 830-acre park, with its world-class, 16-turn, 2.38 mile racetrack opened to the public. The 144,000-square-foot museum houses a collection of more than 1,400 motorcycles, a Guinness Book World Record for the world’s largest motorcycle collection, and an 82,000-square-foot renovation is currently under way. George Barber’s impressive collection is displayed in the museum’s Guggenheim-inspired spiral gallery layout. These motorcycles are breathtaking works of art that offer unique cultural and historical insights.

“Leeds has a lot of history to be proud of and is postured to take on the challenges of new growth. Although Barber is in the city limits of Birmingham, Leeds was quick to realize the opportunities Barber brought to Leeds, and their leaders were instrumental in the development around the Barber project,” says Jeff Ray, executive director of the museum, adding that the best thing about Leeds is “the people and the attitude the leaders have to improve their community—and Rusty’s Bar-B-Q!”

The museum is designed in a Guggenheim-inspired spiral that offers breathtaking views of the massive motorcycle collection. | Image: Barber Museum

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum is designed in a Guggenheim-inspired spiral that offers breathtaking views of the massive motorcycle collection. | Image: Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum

The museum is filled with motorcycles that double as beautiful works of art. Many famous visitors have come to see this impressive collection, including Billy Joel, who left his autograph of the column of the shop downstairs.

The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum is filled with motorcycles that double as beautiful works of art. Many famous visitors have come to see this impressive collection, including Billy Joel, who left his autograph on the column of the shop downstairs.

Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum got its start in the Southside district of downtown Birmingham, but after a show at New York City's Guggenheim, visionary George Barber had bigger plans for his acclaimed and rapidly growing motorcycle collection. | Image: Benjamin N. Smith

Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum got its start in the Southside district of downtown Birmingham, but after a show at New York City’s Guggenheim, visionary George Barber had bigger plans for his acclaimed and rapidly growing motorcycle collection. Image: Benjamin N. Smith

The track is home to the Porsche Sport Driving School, and numerous automakers have chosen the park as the stage for vehicle debuts and film commercials. The grounds are also home of the annual Barber Vintage Festival, which is in its 11th year and is recognized as one of the most highly anticipated motorcycle events in the world. | Image: Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum

The Barber racetrack is home to the Porsche Sport Driving School, and numerous automakers have chosen it as the stage for vehicle debuts and film commercials. The grounds are also home to the annual Barber Vintage Festival, now in its 11th year and is recognized as one of the most highly anticipated motorcycle events in the world. | Image: Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum

Rusty’s Bar-B-Q

This humble hole-in-the-wall is darn-tootin’ delicious. It’s no wonder every local mentions Rusty’s as the best eatery in town, because this joint gets barbeque right. Proprietor Jonathan “Rusty” Tucker started cooking when he was 6 years old and entered the restaurant industry at age 15. He met his wife, Beth, at culinary school at Johnson & Wales University. “Knowing that I wanted to own a restaurant and learning that I did not want to be in the high-pressure fine dining world, I decided to open Rusty’s Bar-B-Q,” says Rusty. “We are very traditional in our preparations: We smoke low and slow over hickory in an open-brick pit. Many larger Bar-B-Q restaurants have gone to using large gas-fired smokers, and I believe that takes the character and skill out of cooking true Bar-B-Q.” The pulled pork is the most popular dish on the menu, but Rusty believes that the ribs are his best offering. And the Huffington Post agrees, recently listing them as the best ribs in the state. Beth puts her baking and pastry degree to good use, making all of the restaurant’s award-winning desserts.

"One of our core values as a company is Family," says Rusty. "Rusty's Bar-B-Q is a family-owned and -operated restaurant, but it's not just about our personal family; it's also about the family-friendly atmosphere, our staff family and our customer family."

“One of our core values as a company is family,” says Rusty’s Bar-B-Q owner Jonathan “Rusty” Tucker. “Rusty’s Bar-B-Q is a family-owned and -operated restaurant, but it’s not just about our personal family; it’s also about the family-friendly atmosphere, our staff family and our customer family.”

The award-winning chicken, pork and ribs are cooked in an open pit with a variety of sauces to satisfy your palate. They’re also known for their killer hamburgers and cheeseburgers!

The award-winning chicken, pork and ribs are cooked in an open pit with a variety of sauces to satisfy your palate. Rusty’s Bar-B-Q is also known for its killer burgers!

"We love partnering with different charities such as the Arc of Jefferson County, The Red Barn, The Wellhouse and Kid One Transport to name a few," says Rusty's Bar-B-Q owner Jonathan "Rusty" Tucker. "We also tend to help out with anything going on at Barber Motorsports Park, as well as the Regions Tradition Golf Tournament each year."

“We love partnering with different charities, such as the Arc of Jefferson County, The Red Barn, The Wellhouse and Kid One Transport to name a few,” says Rusty’s Bar-B-Q owner Jonathan “Rusty” Tucker. “We also tend to help out with anything going on at Barber Motorsports Park, as well as the Regions Tradition Golf Tournament each year.”

Rusty's Bar-B-Q is a Leeds favorite!

Rusty’s Bar-B-Q is a Leeds favorite!

Earthborn Pottery

“Our art teacher in high school invited Dr. Lowell Vann from Samford University to demonstrate throwing on the potter’s wheel. The moment I saw the clay move in his hands, I was forever hooked. I checked books out of the library and mimicked the way they held their hands in the photos, and taught myself how to throw,” recalls Tena Payne, master potter and owner of Earthborn Pottery, who admits she was a bit of a troublemaker and might have skipped class that day, adding, “I can’t imagine what or where my life would be had that event never happened.”

Tena’s love for pottery was unparalleled. She even begged to borrow the potter’s wheel over Christmas break during high school, and she continued to hone her craft through the years on the side. Her passion turned into a full-time career after Birmingham Chef Chris Hastings of Hot and Hot Fish Club was buying shiitake mushrooms from the Payne family, and inquired about Tena’s other endeavors. Once she mentioned her pottery, he commissioned a batch, and the rest, as they say, is history. Now, Earthborn Pottery is sold all over the world, and Tena’s pottery is a popular choice for many restaurants across the nation. “I love making beautiful, functional things. We need more beauty in our lives,” says Tena. “And I love working with chefs. They are artists, too. Their medium is the food. My art is the frame for their art. It all works together so well.”

The signature marking on all of Earthborn Pottery is the Chamber Nautilus. It is a fitting symbol, as it is often used as the golden spiral. You will find its symbol in poetry, art and now, Birmingham’s most prolific pottery studio.

The signature marking on all of Earthborn Pottery is the Chamber Nautilus. It is a fitting symbol, as it is often used as the golden spiral. You will find its symbol in poetry, art and now, Alabama’s most prolific pottery studio.

Tena Payne with her son, Nathan, who has grown up around pottery. Both Nathan and his father have been very supportive of Tena's hobby-turned-big-business. Nathan collects and repairs vintage cars and motorcycles, which can be found around the sprawling studio warehouse. He and his father also serve as beekeepers, and the Payne's backyard-harvested honey sits in the windowsill in the Earthborn gallery store.

Tena Payne with her son, Nathan, who has grown up around pottery. Both Nathan and his father have been very supportive of Tena’s hobby-turned-big business. Nathan collects and repairs vintage cars and motorcycles, which can be found around the sprawling studio warehouse. He and his father also serve as beekeepers, and the Payne’s backyard-harvested honey sits in the windowsill in the Earthborn gallery shop.

"The alchemy of the clay, glazes, and heat is just amazing... the transformation of materials is constantly awe-inspiring. I'll never lose the fascination of it all," says Earthborn Pottery founder and master potter, Tena Payne.

“The alchemy of the clay, glazes and heat is just amazing … the transformation of materials is constantly awe-inspiring. I’ll never lose the fascination of it all,” says Earthborn Pottery founder and master potter, Tena Payne.

The Sonnet House

The Sonnet House was originally built in 1918 and was the McLaughlin Farm. The current Sonnet House owners purchased the property at auction in 2003, with the intention of transforming it into a wedding venue, which opened after renovations in 2007. Ellen Morgan of the Sonnet House says that as an old farmhouse, they have a casual, laid-back atmosphere and attract equally laid-back clients. “Leeds certainly has that small-town feel. We absolutely love being a part of the neighborhood,” says Ellen. “When we have bands for receptions, it isn’t uncommon to get a Facebook message or two from our neighbors telling us that they’re having dinner on their porch, enjoying the tunes. Not every city gets to experience things like that.”

And the Sonnet House staff is invested in its people. “When you work with families for a year, sometimes longer, you grow attached to them and are just as happy to celebrate their big day as they are,” says Ellen. “Our couples are a constant reminder of why we do what we do. The reward of knowing that you’ve helped someone make their dream a reality is the best feeling in the world.”

The Sonnet House books events six months to two years in advance. | Image: Simple Color Photography

The Sonnet House books events six months to two years in advance. Image: Simple Color Photography

After opening in 2007 we quickly became known as the venue with the red bathtub. All of our restrooms at The Sonnet House feature large, claw foot tubs. The second owners in the 70's made renovations to the original house (including the addition of the second and third floors), and when we purchased it the red bathtub was already here. We thought it made a fabulous statement and decided to keep it. | Image: Ann Wade Photography

“After opening in 2007, we quickly became known as the venue with the red bathtub,” says Ellen Morgan of The Sonnet House. “All of our restrooms feature large, clawfoot tubs. The second owners in the ’70s made renovations to the original house, and, when we purchased it, the red bathtub was already here. We thought it made a fabulous statement and decided to keep it!” Image: Ann Wade Photography

"I always feel like everyone knows each other," says Ellen Morgan of the Sonnet House of the Leeds community. "Whether you're at a festival in the park or doing your weekly shopping at the Cost Plus Ten, you're bound to run into someone you know." | Image: Ann Wade Photography

“I always feel like everyone knows each other,” says Ellen Morgan of The Sonnet House about living in the Leeds community. “Whether you’re at a festival in the park or doing your weekly shopping at the Cost Plus Ten, you’re bound to run into someone you know.” Image: Ann Wade Photography

Pants Store

“My grandfather, Taylor Gee, was a pants wholesaler who opened the warehouse here in Leeds in 1950, and the public started coming to him direct. So, people started calling it the Pants Store, hence the name,” says Michael Gee, current owner of the Pants Store, who began sorting hangers as a boy. Several employees have worked at the Pants Store for over 40 years each, and one was a fifth-generation employee. These days, the Pants Store sells much more than just pants. From Yeti coolers and mugs, sunglasses, jewelry, Hunter boots and other fashionable shoes, gameday apparel and more, the Pants Store is a versatile shop with fashion-forward clothing and other items of interest to Alabama customers in Leeds, Trussville, Crestline, Tuscaloosa and Huntsville. Michael’s favorite thing about Leeds is the small-town feel, and he loves that he is part of one of Leeds’ long-standing family businesses. “I enjoyed working with my father everyday and I enjoy working with my brother. The people I work with are like family, too,” says Michael. “I enjoy what I do.”

The Pants Store's original '50s-era signage utterly charming.

The Pants Store‘s original ’50s-era signage along Parkway Drive in downtown Leeds is utterly charming.

“My grandfather had sales in the '60s where he bussed people in from Birmingham to get three pants for $10," says the Pants Store owner Michael Gee. | Image: Michael Gee

“My grandfather had sales in the ’60s where he bused people in from Birmingham to get three pants for $10,” says the Pants Store owner Michael Gee. Image: Michael Gee

The Pants Store is boss at catering to the needs and desires of local clientele, delivering what's trending on a hyper-local level, from Auburn and Alabama game-day apparel to items suited to the Alabama weather and more.

The Pants Store is boss at catering to the needs and desires of local clientele, delivering what’s trending on a hyper-local level, from Auburn and Alabama gameday apparel to items suited to the Alabama weather and more.

Green Up Garden Shop

“My grandparents had a small farm in the bend of the Little Tallapoosa River,” says Green Up Garden Shop owner Lisa Herren. “They were excellent gardeners and planted most everything by the moon signs. My brother and I learned so much from them. My grandmother had lots of beautiful flowers, which my grandfather found very unnecessary. He liked growing stuff that you could eat. I guess that started my love of gardening.” After years in the marketing world, followed by the offer of an out-of-state transfer, Lisa decided it was time to return to her roots. So she went back to school to study horticulture and landscape design, and worked in the green industry for about five years, never quite finding the perfect fit.

“I do believe that fate led me to the empty lot with the big, awesome pecan tree,” says Lisa. “I knew the nice man, James Moore, that owned the property. He liked the idea of a garden shop. With the help of my boyfriend, Luke Doege, Green Up came to life in 2012.” Green Up Garden Shop offers annual color, perennials, native plants and uncommon plants, as well as landscape design and planting of pots and small annual or perennial beds. And the garden lot has become a popular gathering spot. Several garden clubs have meetings at the shop, and a group of gentlemen gather on the porch of the Green Up shack, underneath the shade of the towering pecan tree, for coffee each morning. “The gentlemen agree that the tree is over 100 years old,“ says Lisa of the lot’s dramatic and rather romantic centerpiece.

“The best thing about Green Up Garden Shop is the welcome and relaxed feeling. When you enter, you are reminded that sometimes you just need to chill out. I think that’s why it’s a favorite hangout in town,” says Linda of her lovely lot.

"There is a flower garden in front of Green Up that I call Mema's Garden. It has many of the cool plants that came from my grandmother," says Green Up Garden Shop owner Lisa Herren.

“There is a flower garden in front of Green Up that I call Mema’s Garden. It has many of the cool plants that came from my grandmother,” says Green Up Garden Shop owner Lisa Herren.

Green Up Garden Shop encourages school tours and home-school visits, and they participate in the Leeds Fall Festival, Leeds Farmers' Market, Leeds Literary Club Plant Sale and Leeds Arts Council Fall Fashion Show. "My goal is to do more educational programs for the community," says Lisa.

Green Up Garden Shop encourages school tours and home-school visits, and they participate in the Leeds Fall Festival, Leeds Farmers’ Market, Leeds Literary Club Plant Sale and Leeds Arts Council Fall Fashion Show. “My goal is to do more educational programs for the community,” says Lisa.

"I like Leeds the most because of the 'real' people that have been so kind, helpful and supportive," says Green Up owner Lisa Herren, citing the people, like the group of men that come for coffee each morning, that are drawn to the shack porch under the inviting shade of the towering pecan tree.

“I like Leeds the most because of the ‘real’ people that have been so kind, helpful and supportive,” says Green Up owner Lisa Herren, citing the people, like the group of men that come for coffee each morning, that are drawn to the shack porch under the inviting shade of the towering pecan tree. Image: Green Up Garden Shop

Green Up Garden Shop owner Lisa Herren also has chickens, roosters, goats, cats and her best friend, a dog named Eddie for Mr. Eddie Aldridge of Aldridge's Garden Shop. | Images: Green Up Garden Shop

Green Up Garden Shop owner Lisa Herren also has chickens, roosters, goats, cats and her best friend, a dog named Eddie, for Mr. Eddie Aldridge of Aldridge’s Garden Shop. Images: Green Up Garden Shop

The Monkey’s Uncle, The Monkey’s Uncle Christmas Store and The Sassy Monkey Boutique

The Monkey’s Uncle is a well-known gift store on Parkway Drive that opened in 2003, after owners Michael Dyer and Tim Jennings, both wholesale gift sales representatives, decided to open their own retail shop in Leeds. The Monkey’s Uncle offers fragrances, jewelry, home decor, collegiate gifts, birthday and anniversary gifts, baby clothing and accessories, cookbooks, Tervis tumblers, tableware and other sundry items. In 2008, The Monkey’s Uncle Christmas Store opened its doors during the holiday shopping season, from September to January. This specialty shop exclusively features Christmas gifts and decor, with more than 20 trees and countless decorations, including Mark Roberts fairies, Old World ornaments, Department 56, Jim Shore and others. And just last year, Michael and Tim opened The Sassy Monkey Boutique, a women’s clothing shop where “the clothing, jewelry and handbags are sassy, indeed,” says Tim.

A glance at the Monkey's Uncle gift shop wares

A mere snapshot of the incredible variety at the Monkey’s Uncle’s gift shop

Some of the cool threads and fun accessories at the Sassy Monkey

Some of the cool threads and fun accessories at the Sassy Monkey Boutique

Higher Ground Roasters

Higher Ground Roasters is an award-winning coffee roaster in the heart of downtown Leeds. This ecofriendly and socially conscious company exclusively roasts 100 percent certified organic, fair trade, and shade-grown coffees. “We make the sustainable choice, because it speaks to our commitment to quality coffee with a conscience. Profits earned from Fair Trade Coffee ensure our growers are able to keep their family-owned farms and benefit from economic and educational programs. Every cup of Higher Ground is a vote for the rights of small-scale, independent farmers who grow their coffee organically under the forest canopy,” reads the Higher Ground manifesto. They are also committed to our local land, partnering with nonprofit organizations dedicated to the preservation and protection of our rivers and lands. Leeds-based Higher Ground Roasters’ high-quality coffee beans can be found across the country, from North Dakota to New York.

Higher Ground Coffee Roasters create custom blends for Modica Market in Seaside, Florida, as well as for WBHM Birmingham's NPR station, among other recognizable client names.

Higher Ground Roasters create custom coffee blends for Modica Market in Seaside, FL, as well as for WBHM Birmingham’s NPR station, among other recognizable client names.

If you look closely, you'll see custom-made stickers to match custom coffee blends for the Greater Birmingham Humane Society, Jones Valley Urban Farms and Catherine's Market.

If you look closely, you’ll see custom-made stickers to match custom coffee blends for the Greater Birmingham Humane Society, Jones Valley Urban Farms and Catherine’s Market.

Maison de France

Ginny Smith and her mother, Frances Stanford, co-owners of Maison de France, travel to France three or four times a year to hand select one-of-a-kind European antiques for their 9,000-square-foot showroom in downtown Leeds. They have been open for 15 years, and are one of Greater Birmingham’s premier direct importers of French and English antique furniture and unique home decor items, such as confit pots, altar sticks, fish plates, mirrors and architectural fragments. Ginny and Frances always have their eye trained to spot what’s authentic, interesting and beautiful—much like the neighborhood surrounding their shop. “We love Leeds,” says Ginny of their chosen storefront location. “It is a small town that has a lot to offer. The people are nice, and the streets are always clean and decorated for the season with hanging baskets of flowers in the spring and twinkle lights and holiday decor around Christmas. It’s a great atmosphere.”

a beautiful collection of altar sticks at Maison de France in Leeds, Alabama

A beautiful collection of altar sticks at Maison de France

You can find antique pieces that seamlessly mix with more modern styles at Maison de France.

You can find antique pieces that seamlessly mix with more modern styles at Maison de France.

Incredibly detailed, one-of-a-kind pieces about at Maison de France's huge treasure-filled showroom.

Incredibly detailed, one-of-a-kind pieces abound at Maison de France‘s huge, treasure-filled showroom.

Take a day trip to Leeds for some delicious barbecue, fun shopping, a little history and a healthy dose of small-town charm. And when you stop by, make sure to tell them StyleBlueprint sent you!